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Human Noble City Elf Dalish Elf Magi Dwarf Commoner Dwarf Noble Grey Warden
Human Noble City Elf Dalish Elf Magi Dwarf Commoner Dwarf Noble Grey Warden

There are six origins—background stories for player characters—that are playable in Dragon Age: Origins and a seventh in Dragon Age: Origins – Awakening. These playable prestories will allow the Warden to put themselves in a specific role within the social structure of Ferelden and will help explain motivations for the Warden joining the Grey Wardens.

The origins are open to both genders, but they are dependent upon both race and class. Dwarves cannot be mages. In Thedas they are unable to interact with the Fade (i.e., dream) and are therefore incredibly resistant to magic. In order to become a mage, and use magic, players must go through the Magi origin and choose to be an elf or a human. The other two classes (warrior and rogue) are available to all other races and origins.

All of the origins have set surnames. Depending on the character's indentity, this surname could be very important to the origin plot, later plots and subplots, and even the Epilogue, or it could be almost totally inconsequential from a plot standpoint.

Possible Combinations

Since players will be able to choose gender, race, class, and then origin for their Warden in that order, the following combinations are available for both genders:

RaceClassOrigin
Human
For the class in specific games, see Warrior (Origins), Warrior (Dragon Age II), and Warrior (Inquisition).
Warrior

A warrior in battle

Warrior is one of the three playable starting classes in Dragon Age: Origins, Dragon Age: Origins - Awakening, Dragon Age Legends, Dragon Age II, Dragon Age (tabletop RPG), and Dragon Age: Inquisition. Warriors are the front-line fighters, the backbone of any party under assault.

In Dragon Age: Origins they rely on both melee and ranged weapons but in Dragon Age II and Dragon Age: Inquisition they only rely on melee weapons. Also they are supplemented by powerful special abilities that draw from deep reserves of stamina. They can withstand and deliver a great deal of punishment, and have a strong understanding of tactics. In Origins and Inquisition, all races can play as a warrior.

Warrior Green Ronin

Warrior from Dragon Age tabletop RPG by Green Ronin

Alistair Sword and Shield

Sword and Shield Warrior

Sten Two Hander

Two-Hander Warrior

Notable warriors

For a complete list, see :Category:Warriors.

Dragon Age: Origins

Dragon Age: Origins - Awakening

Dragon Age II

Dragon Age: Inquisition

See also

Codex icon DAI Codex entry: Bruiser
Codex icon DAI Codex entry: Guardsman
||Human Noble
Human
For the class in specific games, see Rogue (Origins), Rogue (Dragon Age II), and Rogue (Inquisition).
Rogue class

Rogue concept from Dragon Age RPG, set 1[1]

DA RPG Set 3 Rogue

Rogue concept from Dragon Age RPG, set 3[2]

Rogue is one of three playable classes in Dragon Age: Origins, Dragon Age: Origins - Awakening, Dragon Age Legends, Dragon Age II, Dragon Age (tabletop RPG), and Dragon Age: Inquisition. Rogues are crafty combatants who succeed in battle by combining speed, subterfuge, and a wide range of abilities to bring their opponents down in unexpected ways, sometimes before the enemy even perceives danger.

Rogues can pick locks with great skill[3], incapacitate enemies with ease, or sneak up on targets to deliver a devious and crippling backstab. Dexterity and Cunning are essential for a rogue, as many rogue and rogue specialization abilities rely on high cunning and dexterity.

Notable rogues

For a complete list, see :Category:Rogues.

Dragon Age: Origins

Dragon Age: Origins - Awakening

Dragon Age II

Dragon Age: Inquisition

See also

Codex icon DAI Codex entry: Archers
Codex icon DAI Codex entry: Prowler
Codex icon DAI Codex entry: Foot Soldier

Gallery

References

  1. Dragon Age RPG Set Player's Guide, page 28.
  2. http://greenronin.com/2013/04/dragon_age_set_3_class_preview_1.php
  3. Rogues are the only class capable of picking locks on both chests and doors in Dragon Age: Origins and Dragon Age II, and this trend continues in Dragon Age: Inquisition, per Mike Laidlaw.
||Human Noble
Human
For the class in specific games, see Mage (Origins), Mage (Dragon Age II), and Mage (Inquisition).
Concept-Mage

The mage is a playable class in Dragon Age: Origins, Dragon Age: Origins - Awakening, Dragon Age Legends, Dragon Age II, Dragon Age (tabletop RPG), and Dragon Age: Inquisition. Mages are able to use, control and interact with magic. In order to qualify to be a mage, one must be an elf, a human, or a Qunari. Dwarves cannot be mages, as they are unable to connect with the Fade. This is due to their prolonged exposure to lyrium, becoming immune to its effects.

Characteristics

A mage is fire made flesh and a demon asleep ―proverb
Velanna casting spell

Velanna spellcasting.

In Thedas, magic is a natural physical phenomenon such as gravity or magnetism. Some people are born with the ability to interact with, control, and shape it. The Tevinter Imperium even had mage genealogies of all families that would produce children with magical talent. Eventually, several social classes of mages were established in Tevinter, from the "Altus" (magisters), mages who had a long lineage of magic in their bloodlines, to the "Laetan" - mages with no family history of magic use.

Conventional magic originates from the Fade, the realm where spirits dwell and where humans, qunari, and elves visit when they dream. For non-mages, entering the Fade while dreaming is a fleeting experience; but for mages, they are fully conscious during the entire incident. Mana is a measurement of one's ability to channel energy from the Fade, and this energy is expended in the practice of magic. Just as the Fade can be reshaped by those who have grasped its nature, so can the world of Thedas be manipulated by magic via willing things into being. The ability of a living being to expend mana is what defines a mage[1][2] and certain people are born with this potential, although noone knows the reason why.

The act of drawing power from the Fade can draw the attention of the spiritual beings on the other side of the Veil, leading to an increased risk of demonic possession if the mages are not vigilant enough. A possessed mage becomes a distortion of his or her former self, a twisted monster known as an abomination that has enough power to wipe entire villages off the map. It is for this reason that a mage must have enough willpower to master their magic so they can resist demons while they are "awake" in the Fade.

With the proper training, mages are capable of manipulating the basic elements, such as conjuring gouts of flame and small, localized ice and electrical storms. There are also spells that allow for the temporary reanimation of corpses and the draining of an opponent's life-force. More altruistic mages can use their powers to help and heal, or summon benevolent spirits in times of need. Though they are often ostracized to the point of persecution, mages are key for everyday life in Thedas. They serve as its healers, scholars, scientists, and weapons of war.

Spirit mediums are called the mages who possess the rare talent of detecting and communicating with demons and spirits. Rhys is known to be a spirit medium.[3]

There are limitations to the application of magic, however. Just as a man has the strength to lift only so much weight and no more, a mage cannot work more magic at one time than his mana allows. If he wishes to work magic that would be beyond his strength, a mage must bolster his mana with lyrium. Without lyrium, it is possible for the reckless to expend their own life-force in the working of magic, and occasionally, ambitious apprentices injure or even kill themselves by over-exertion.[2]

Teleportation, resurrection (under normal circumstances) [4] and physically entering the Fade (in the absence of a great deal of lyrium and potentially the aid of blood magic) are not possible.[5] Magic also cannot prevent a potentially fatal incident such as falling from a building.[6] Furthermore, the powers of a mage require a direct line of sight to a target, and have a limited range.[7]

There are two schools of magic that bear no connection to the Fade: blood magic, which draws power directly from blood, and blight magic, which is driven by the taint.

The working of magic

A mage uses magic by tapping into the power of the Fade to essentially question reality, rendering it mutable and able to be reshaped. To this end, templars are the ideal foils for mages, having been trained specifically to counter and "deny" magic.[8] This is done by a unique method of reinforcing the reality and immutability of the world. Like a door being slammed in the mage's face, magical effects dissipate and the mage is unable to reshape a suddenly stubborn world. From a mage's perspective it appears to be less spell interruption and more a templar reinforcing a reality in which that spell cannot be cast in the first place.[9] Cole offers a different explanation for the powers of the templars: after ingesting lyrium their bodies become incomplete and try to connect to something older and bigger than they are. They reach for that "other thing" and magic has no room to come in.[10]

Schools of Magic

History

No one knows who first discovered magic, but it has been a part of the world of Thedas for as long as people can remember. From the elves of Arlathan to the mages of Tevinter, both humans and elves have been known to wield magic.

Before it became the Imperium, Tevinter was ruled by a dynasty of kings. And long before the Chantry there was a Circle of Magi: the society of mages in each city. The titles the modern Circles use—enchanter, senior enchanter, first enchanter—all originated here. But above the first enchanter, the Circles of Tevinter had another office: magister.

The magisters formed a council of the most powerful mages in the kingdom. They convened in Minrathous and held dominion over all magic in the land. When Darinius seized the throne in -1195 Ancient, the Court of the Magisters became the royal court, and "magister" was the only title of nobility recognized in Tevinter.[11]

Prior to the Circle’s formation, magic was either practiced by the Magisters of the Tevinter Imperium or in remote areas, knowledge handed down from one generation of practitioners to the next. “Hedge mages,” as Enchanters of the Circle refer to them, or “witches” as legend would name them, do not always employ forbidden magic. Quite often their talents lie in the creation of charms, the use of curses and the ability to change their own forms.[12] Examples of such Hedge mages and witches include the so-called "witches" of the Chasind wilders or the "shamans" of the Avvar barbarians.[13]

In the quest Long Way Home (Dragon Age II), it is revealed that elves were heavily reliant on magic in the days of Arlathan, and that it is possible that it was they who taught blood magic to the Tevinter magisters. Merrill, for instance, once refers to her blood magic as "the old ways." Legend holds that the first known blood mage, at least for the humans, was a Tevinter: Archon Thalsian. Thalsian was supposedly taught how to use blood magic by the Old God Dumat. Over the years, some historians have argued that this is merely a myth, and that Thalsian learned about blood magic from the elves. Thalsian taught blood magic to others and soon amassed an army, which he used to conquer Elvhenan, the homeland of the elves. This was the start of the Tevinter Imperium, which grew to include most of Thedas, and which worshipped the Old Gods.

The Imperium was not satisfied with control of Thedas, however, and in an incredible act of hubris, the magister lords attempted to enter the Golden City and supposedly usurp the Maker Himself. Their efforts failed, and to punish them, Chantry historians believe that the Maker transformed them into the first darkspawn. These darkspawn fled underground, and eventually found Dumat and transformed him into the first Archdemon. Thus began the First Blight, which would continue for two centuries and greatly weakened the Tevinter Imperium.

In the wake of the First Blight, the people of the Imperium became disillusioned with the Old Gods, and soon began to follow Andraste, a former slave who united the barbarian tribes and led them to break the Imperium's hold on Thedas. Andraste was ultimately betrayed by her husband, Maferath, and burned at the stake, but her death inspired the creation of the Chantry, an event that would alter the face of magic for centuries afterwards.

The Chantry

In 1:20 Divine, the Chantry and the Inquisition signed the Nevarran Accord, and created the Circle of Magi, the Templar Order and the Seekers of Truth.[14]

As magic had been the source of the Imperium's power, it was all but banned when the Chantry became the new dominant force in Thedas. Blood magic was completely forbidden, and those who practised any kind of magic were confined. At first, the Chantry detained mages and had them continually light the eternal flame in every chantry in Thedas, with all other forms of magic forbidden. For such powerful beings to only use their powers in such mundane ways, it surprised almost no one when the mages of the Grand Cathedral protested. Divine Ambrosia was surprised and almost ordered an Exalted March on her own Cathedral, until her own templars advised her otherwise.[15] The Circle of Magi was established to regulate the use of magic throughout Thedas, and the Templar Order was founded to police the Circles and capture or eliminate apostate mages.

Modern Thedas

Andrastian nations

Mage Green Ronin

Mage from Dragon Age RPG

Mages attacking a Pride Demon
Main article: Circle of Magi

In the Dragon Age, most mages in Thedas belong to the Circle of Magi. As such, they are taken from their families while still children, and highborn children who are able to use magic will lose all claims to their family's estates and titles when they are taken to the Circle. This helps to create a bond stronger than social class or race, since everybody in the Circle is raised and taught the same way.

Children who are born to mages within the Circle are taken to be raised in a Chantry orphanage, either until they are old enough to make a life on their own (likely within the Chantry itself as a cleric or templar) or their magical abilities have manifested and they are returned to the Circle.[16]

Upon joining a Circle, mages undergo a process as apprentices of having a few drops of their blood taken by the First Enchanter[17] and placed in a phylactery. This ensures the mages' compliance as well as the ability to track down any mage who decides to run away, since a templar can track anyone through their blood. As a further measure, mages who are feared to be incapable of controlling themselves, or who fear their power, are made Tranquil: their connection to the Fade is magically severed along with their emotions and desires.

Though templars insist that the process is painless, the experience appears to be debatable and as unique as the individual who has been rendered Tranquil.[18] The Tranquil are easily identified by their eerie monotone voices, the Chantry sunburst brand on their foreheads, and their emotional apathy, even during life-threatening circumstances. It is worth noting, however, that under normal circumstances there is a reason a mage either is made Tranquil or requests it. Furthermore, imposing the Rite of Tranquility normally requires the agreement of both the Circle Knight-Commander and First Enchanter.[19]

The Harrowing is a test that every mage-apprentice must go through to become a full member of the Circle of Magi. Upon successful completion of his or her Harrowing, an apprentice is considered a full-fledged mage, capable of defending himself or herself from demonic possession.

Some mages manage to escape the notice of the Chantry and the Circle, and grow up without the training that those who are taken from their families will have. Any mage not a part of the Circle is considered to be an apostate, and will be hunted by templars if discovered. Often apostates will wield magic unknown or forbidden to the Circle, and considered threatening by the Chantry. Such mages include the Witches of the Wilds, who are capable of changing their shape and are frequently harassed by templars.[20]

Most humans are taught by the Chantry to fear magic and those who practice it. Mages are looked upon as people to be pitied at best, and hated at worst.[21] The average citizen sincerely believes that the Circle exists only to protect mages and help them learn to control their abilities.

Tevinter

Dragon-age-concept05

Tevinter Concept Art

Tevinter mages

Tevinter Mages

The native culture in the Tevinter Imperium is that magic is considered a mark of honor, especially for those who are powerful enough and adept to use it to their advantage. Tevinter has its own Imperial Chantry and many of its mages are the scions of its ancient noble bloodlines, who have long nurtured the magic in their genealogy. Even Tevinter commoners view magic as a gift and a part of their culture, so mages are respected across all social classes more than in other countries. In fact, the hope that their offspring or descendants will be born a mage and thus raise the family's social status keeps the commoners placated.

Due to the Imperium's rooted history with magic, the descendants of Tevinter's elite, even after converting to Andrastian teachings, still retained their power and influence but their appreciation of magic conflicted with the Chantry's fear of magic. This inevitable conflict in beliefs led to a schism in ideology between the Tevinter Chantry and the Orlais Chantry. The Tevinter Chantry argued that the Chant of Light's commandment, "magic exists to serve man, and never to rule over him," meant that magic must serve the greater good. They believed that this could be accomplished by freeing Magi to take part in government. After the Imperial Chantry broke away from the Orlesian Chantry's influence, mages were allowed to assume their place as the true rulers of the nation once again.

Though mages rule Tevinter, not all mages are equal. Where one falls in the social hierarchy is dependent on where one falls in Tevinter's caste system. If a mage isn't born in the right family, chances are they don't rule anything. Tevinter Circles of Magi are prestigious academies, not mage prisons. Yet admittance to a Tevinter Circle is a privilege, not a right.[22] The mages in Tevinter aspire to be magisters: the true rulers of the Imperium. Obtaining status and influence in the Tevinter Imperium is highly competitive however and thus often breeds practices of greed, corruption, and blood magic. Those without magic are trampled underfoot and forced to serve. Behind closed doors, slaves are sometimes sacrificed to fuel a magister's forbidden magic. Even some mages are not spared, for in mages as in all humans, there exists a spectrum—on one end, the very powerful, on the other, those that can barely light a candle. The Empire cares only for the strongest, and those who do not compare favorably are thrown to the wolves.[23]

Slaves and Liberati, particularly elves, who demonstrate magical ability are furthermore able to join the Circle of Magi and the lowest rungs of mage society. This applies as well to the children of elven slaves, and facilitates a dubious sense among them of a "meritocracy" within Tevinter even amongst the lowest classes. However, even for those gifted elven slaves who are able to join the magocracy, there is still an element of racism that creates obstacles beyond being seen as a fellow mage. Furthermore, mundane slaves cannot, of course, take part in this meritocratic system any more than any other non-talented citizen can.[24]

According to Fenris, though magisters claim that blood magic is forbidden, it's no secret that any Tevinter mage of rank secretly practices it or at least are proficient in its use. This is also confirmed by Lambert and Dorian. However, what is considered blood magic in Tevinter is different than what other Andrastian nations consider blood magic. Still, even what Tevinter considers forbidden magic is practiced by the upper echelon behind closed doors in order to maintain their edge against their adversaries.

Hedge Mages

Apostate mages

Apostate mages[25]

Main article: Hedge mage

Hedge mages are untrained magic-users who wield powers developed outside of conventional teaching[26] of the Circle of Magi and because of this, they are all apostates. Some of these hedge mages are not even aware of their nature. Undeveloped, their abilities can express themselves in a variety of ways, which the hedge mage might attribute to faith, or will, or to another being entirely (depending on the mage's nature).[13]

More specifically hedge magic, known by its more technical name "arcanist derangement"[27] among mages and scholars, is a form of magical expression different than that of typical mages. The term was coined by Magister Allineas at the height of the Towers Age. The magister posited that magical talent is like a flowing river. When expressed through a mage, it finds a proper outlet through spellcraft. Left to its own devices it flows unexpectedly, and thus hedge mages are created. Prior to the creation of the Circles, such magical talent expressed itself often through ancient traditions and rituals. Those mages possessed powers that no Circle spell could replicate and their unpredictable ability was deemed a threat.

Hedge mages live chaotic lives, able to commune with spirits, lured into darkness and temptation and sometimes even insanity. Their lives are often short as a result of this wild talent. The term "arcanist derangement" reflects this propensity toward madness in such mages.[28]

The term "hedge mage" was created as a derogatory term by the Chantry.[27]

Rivain

The Rivaini, unlike the majority of peoples in Thedas, are not andrastians and don't believe in the Maker. Rather, they are pantheists who believe in the Natural Order. As such, many hold to the belief that their god and the universe are the same.[29] Many, especially in Kont-aar, have also converted to the Qun, as their religion and the Qun are not very contradictory. According to Ferdinand Genitivi, a well-known Chantry scholar, "The Chant of Light never truly reached the ears of these people. Resistance to the Chant goes deeper than the Qunari Wars. The Rivaini refuse to be parted from their seers, wise women who are in fact hedge mages, communicating with spirits and actually allowing themselves to be possessed. The Chantry prohibition against such magical practices violates millennia of local tradition."[29]

Though a Circle existed in Rivain, it was merely a means to appease the Chantry. The mages of the Circle were allowed to see their families and the women were specifically trained to be seers, a position in Rivaini society that is revered as a matter of tradition. These local hedge witches converse with spirits and even allow themselves to be possessed, though it is supposedly done so for the benefit of their villages.[30]

Dalish elves

Dragon-Age-Adventurers

An elven mage and companions

Among non-humans, attitudes towards magic vary. The Dalish elves are, for all intents and purposes, the most accepting of their mages. Dalish believe that magic is a gift of the Creators[31] and study of magic is key to rediscovering their lost history. They do, however, acknowledge the inherent danger of magic, and take strides to reduce the risk, as well as avoid incurring the wrath of the templars. Dalish clans are known to exchange their mages if it seems like one clan has too many or too few, so no clan is left without any.[32] These children will be personally instructed by the new tribe's Keeper, and if they demonstrate sufficient aptitude will be elevated to be the Keeper's First (or Second), an apprentice expected to one day become the clan's new Keeper. In some clans, however, those that are extraneous beyond this may be cast out of the clan to survive, or die, on their own.[33]

Every Dalish clan is sworn to protect its Keeper to the death, and should the Keeper fall to demonic possession, the clan is bound to hunt and slay the Keeper. This happens rarely, however, as most Keepers are wise and careful enough to never make deals with demons or use blood magic.

Dalish magic tends to be more practical and subtle than human/Circle magic, shaped by the existence of the Dalish.[34] It is often turned to healing and tends to be more focused on natural forces.[35]

The ancient magic of "Veilfire" is also an elven art, though not specifically a Dalish one. Often used like a torch, veilfire is able to reveal hidden messages and gain impressions of past events, as well as illuminate dim passages...often with the accompanying unearthly whispers of the Fade. According to Solas, "it is a form of sympathetic magic, a memory of flame that burns where the Veil is thin."

Qunari

Qunari-01-mage bound-p

A saarebas concept

See also: Qunari#Magic

On the opposite end of Thedas, the Qunari, bound to order, have virtually no tolerance for mages, which they call saarebas (literally "dangerous thing"). Those among them who are found to possess magical ability are kept on leashes by special soldiers called arvaarad, and fitted with blinders. Their horns are sheared off and in extreme cases their lips may be stitched together. If a saarebas is found practicing forbidden magic, their tongues are cut out to prevent them from corrupting others.[36] Despite these measures, the Qunari pity and honor the saarebas as they believe that their striving while under constant threat from within is truly selfless and that is the highest virtue of the Qun.[22]

Surprisingly, the mages themselves accept their condition without question, as they manage to find some measure of solace within the Qun, since they believe there is a purpose to their existence, even if it means the loss of their freedom. If separated from their arvaarad, they are willing to accept death as they may be corrupted and not even be aware, presenting a danger to themselves and others, as was the case for Ketojan. They pity other mages who are not Qunari, because they will surely doom themselves and everyone who they come in contact with.

Notable mages in Dragon Age

For a complete list, see :Category:Magi.

Trivia

  • Referring to mages as "robes" is an insult.[37]
  • The term 'spellbind' is also considered a slur against mages.[38]
  • Hedge mages as a rule are not respected by enchanters in the Circle of Magi, but their untutored power can be incredible nevertheless.[39]
  • Inquisition's introduction of the Dalish limiting the number of mages within a clan contradict the previous presentation of multiple mages in Zathrian's clan in Dragon Age: Origins and multiple dialogues from Merrill in Dragon Age II on the issue, including her background that reads she was moved to the Sabrae clan because magic is dying out among the Dalish.

See also

Codex icon DAI Codex entry: Mage
Codex icon DAI Codex entry: Spellbinder

References

  1. Prima Official Game Guide (Collector's Edition), p. 252
  2. 2.0 2.1 Codex entry: Mana and the Use of Magic
  3. Dragon Age: Asunder, p. 285
  4. Wynne is an example of how bonding with a spirit at the moment of death may potentially circumvent this rule. Furthermore, according to Maevaris Tilani in Until We Sleep, it is rumored there may be healers who are capable of this.
  5. Codex entry: The Cardinal Rules of Magic.
  6. David Gaider. Dragon Age: Asunder, page 403.
  7. David Gaider. Dragon Age: The Stolen Throne, page 125.
  8. According to Ser (character).
  9. According to banter between Cassandra Pentaghast and Solas.
  10. First conversation with Cole after his recruitment.
  11. Codex entry: Tevinter: The Magisters
  12. Shapeshifter
  13. 13.0 13.1 Codex entry: Apostates
  14. Dragon Age: Asunder, Epilogue.
  15. Codex entry: History of the Circle
  16. David Gaider. Dragon Age: Asunder, page 120.
  17. According to Ser Thrask.
  18. Pharamond notes that Tranquility feels like an inescapable, smothering dream, while Owain states that he is content with his life and chose Tranquility.
  19. Your Random Dragon Age Question?.
  20. According to Morrigan when asked about growing up with Flemeth.
  21. Codex entry: Superstitions
  22. 22.0 22.1 Dragon Age logo - new Dragon Age: The World of Thedas, vol. 1, p. 103
  23. Codex entry: An Honest Answer Regarding Apostates
  24. David Gaider (July 14, 2014). Got the chance to interview David Gaider. Tumblr.
  25. Dragon Age (tabletop RPG), Player's Guide, set 2, p. 59
  26. Dragon Age: The World of Thedas, vol. 1, pg. 105.
  27. 27.0 27.1 Dragon Age: Asunder, pg. 285.
  28. Pharamond, Asunder
  29. 29.0 29.1 Dragon Age: The World of Thedas volume 1, page 80
  30. Dragon Age: The World of Thedas Volume 1, pg. 80
  31. Banter between Merrill and Bethany
  32. Codex entry: Merrill
  33. According to Minaeve.
  34. According to Solas.
  35. Dragon Age: The World of Thedas Volume 1
  36. Dragon Age II: The Complete Official Guide, p. 251
  37. Dragon Age: Asunder
  38. Dragon Age: The World of Thedas Volume 1, volume 1.
  39. According to item description for Storm Talons.
||Magi
Elf
For the class in specific games, see Warrior (Origins), Warrior (Dragon Age II), and Warrior (Inquisition).
Warrior

A warrior in battle

Warrior is one of the three playable starting classes in Dragon Age: Origins, Dragon Age: Origins - Awakening, Dragon Age Legends, Dragon Age II, Dragon Age (tabletop RPG), and Dragon Age: Inquisition. Warriors are the front-line fighters, the backbone of any party under assault.

In Dragon Age: Origins they rely on both melee and ranged weapons but in Dragon Age II and Dragon Age: Inquisition they only rely on melee weapons. Also they are supplemented by powerful special abilities that draw from deep reserves of stamina. They can withstand and deliver a great deal of punishment, and have a strong understanding of tactics. In Origins and Inquisition, all races can play as a warrior.

Warrior Green Ronin

Warrior from Dragon Age tabletop RPG by Green Ronin

Alistair Sword and Shield

Sword and Shield Warrior

Sten Two Hander

Two-Hander Warrior

Notable warriors

For a complete list, see :Category:Warriors.

Dragon Age: Origins

Dragon Age: Origins - Awakening

Dragon Age II

Dragon Age: Inquisition

See also

Codex icon DAI Codex entry: Bruiser
Codex icon DAI Codex entry: Guardsman
||City Elf
Elf
For the class in specific games, see Warrior (Origins), Warrior (Dragon Age II), and Warrior (Inquisition).
Warrior

A warrior in battle

Warrior is one of the three playable starting classes in Dragon Age: Origins, Dragon Age: Origins - Awakening, Dragon Age Legends, Dragon Age II, Dragon Age (tabletop RPG), and Dragon Age: Inquisition. Warriors are the front-line fighters, the backbone of any party under assault.

In Dragon Age: Origins they rely on both melee and ranged weapons but in Dragon Age II and Dragon Age: Inquisition they only rely on melee weapons. Also they are supplemented by powerful special abilities that draw from deep reserves of stamina. They can withstand and deliver a great deal of punishment, and have a strong understanding of tactics. In Origins and Inquisition, all races can play as a warrior.

Warrior Green Ronin

Warrior from Dragon Age tabletop RPG by Green Ronin

Alistair Sword and Shield

Sword and Shield Warrior

Sten Two Hander

Two-Hander Warrior

Notable warriors

For a complete list, see :Category:Warriors.

Dragon Age: Origins

Dragon Age: Origins - Awakening

Dragon Age II

Dragon Age: Inquisition

See also

Codex icon DAI Codex entry: Bruiser
Codex icon DAI Codex entry: Guardsman
||Dalish Elf
Elf
For the class in specific games, see Rogue (Origins), Rogue (Dragon Age II), and Rogue (Inquisition).
Rogue class

Rogue concept from Dragon Age RPG, set 1[1]

DA RPG Set 3 Rogue

Rogue concept from Dragon Age RPG, set 3[2]

Rogue is one of three playable classes in Dragon Age: Origins, Dragon Age: Origins - Awakening, Dragon Age Legends, Dragon Age II, Dragon Age (tabletop RPG), and Dragon Age: Inquisition. Rogues are crafty combatants who succeed in battle by combining speed, subterfuge, and a wide range of abilities to bring their opponents down in unexpected ways, sometimes before the enemy even perceives danger.

Rogues can pick locks with great skill[3], incapacitate enemies with ease, or sneak up on targets to deliver a devious and crippling backstab. Dexterity and Cunning are essential for a rogue, as many rogue and rogue specialization abilities rely on high cunning and dexterity.

Notable rogues

For a complete list, see :Category:Rogues.

Dragon Age: Origins

Dragon Age: Origins - Awakening

Dragon Age II

Dragon Age: Inquisition

See also

Codex icon DAI Codex entry: Archers
Codex icon DAI Codex entry: Prowler
Codex icon DAI Codex entry: Foot Soldier

Gallery

References

  1. Dragon Age RPG Set Player's Guide, page 28.
  2. http://greenronin.com/2013/04/dragon_age_set_3_class_preview_1.php
  3. Rogues are the only class capable of picking locks on both chests and doors in Dragon Age: Origins and Dragon Age II, and this trend continues in Dragon Age: Inquisition, per Mike Laidlaw.
||City Elf
Elf
For the class in specific games, see Rogue (Origins), Rogue (Dragon Age II), and Rogue (Inquisition).
Rogue class

Rogue concept from Dragon Age RPG, set 1[1]

DA RPG Set 3 Rogue

Rogue concept from Dragon Age RPG, set 3[2]

Rogue is one of three playable classes in Dragon Age: Origins, Dragon Age: Origins - Awakening, Dragon Age Legends, Dragon Age II, Dragon Age (tabletop RPG), and Dragon Age: Inquisition. Rogues are crafty combatants who succeed in battle by combining speed, subterfuge, and a wide range of abilities to bring their opponents down in unexpected ways, sometimes before the enemy even perceives danger.

Rogues can pick locks with great skill[3], incapacitate enemies with ease, or sneak up on targets to deliver a devious and crippling backstab. Dexterity and Cunning are essential for a rogue, as many rogue and rogue specialization abilities rely on high cunning and dexterity.

Notable rogues

For a complete list, see :Category:Rogues.

Dragon Age: Origins

Dragon Age: Origins - Awakening

Dragon Age II

Dragon Age: Inquisition

See also

Codex icon DAI Codex entry: Archers
Codex icon DAI Codex entry: Prowler
Codex icon DAI Codex entry: Foot Soldier

Gallery

References

  1. Dragon Age RPG Set Player's Guide, page 28.
  2. http://greenronin.com/2013/04/dragon_age_set_3_class_preview_1.php
  3. Rogues are the only class capable of picking locks on both chests and doors in Dragon Age: Origins and Dragon Age II, and this trend continues in Dragon Age: Inquisition, per Mike Laidlaw.
||Dalish Elf
Elf
For the class in specific games, see Mage (Origins), Mage (Dragon Age II), and Mage (Inquisition).
Concept-Mage

The mage is a playable class in Dragon Age: Origins, Dragon Age: Origins - Awakening, Dragon Age Legends, Dragon Age II, Dragon Age (tabletop RPG), and Dragon Age: Inquisition. Mages are able to use, control and interact with magic. In order to qualify to be a mage, one must be an elf, a human, or a Qunari. Dwarves cannot be mages, as they are unable to connect with the Fade. This is due to their prolonged exposure to lyrium, becoming immune to its effects.

Characteristics

A mage is fire made flesh and a demon asleep ―proverb
Velanna casting spell

Velanna spellcasting.

In Thedas, magic is a natural physical phenomenon such as gravity or magnetism. Some people are born with the ability to interact with, control, and shape it. The Tevinter Imperium even had mage genealogies of all families that would produce children with magical talent. Eventually, several social classes of mages were established in Tevinter, from the "Altus" (magisters), mages who had a long lineage of magic in their bloodlines, to the "Laetan" - mages with no family history of magic use.

Conventional magic originates from the Fade, the realm where spirits dwell and where humans, qunari, and elves visit when they dream. For non-mages, entering the Fade while dreaming is a fleeting experience; but for mages, they are fully conscious during the entire incident. Mana is a measurement of one's ability to channel energy from the Fade, and this energy is expended in the practice of magic. Just as the Fade can be reshaped by those who have grasped its nature, so can the world of Thedas be manipulated by magic via willing things into being. The ability of a living being to expend mana is what defines a mage[1][2] and certain people are born with this potential, although noone knows the reason why.

The act of drawing power from the Fade can draw the attention of the spiritual beings on the other side of the Veil, leading to an increased risk of demonic possession if the mages are not vigilant enough. A possessed mage becomes a distortion of his or her former self, a twisted monster known as an abomination that has enough power to wipe entire villages off the map. It is for this reason that a mage must have enough willpower to master their magic so they can resist demons while they are "awake" in the Fade.

With the proper training, mages are capable of manipulating the basic elements, such as conjuring gouts of flame and small, localized ice and electrical storms. There are also spells that allow for the temporary reanimation of corpses and the draining of an opponent's life-force. More altruistic mages can use their powers to help and heal, or summon benevolent spirits in times of need. Though they are often ostracized to the point of persecution, mages are key for everyday life in Thedas. They serve as its healers, scholars, scientists, and weapons of war.

Spirit mediums are called the mages who possess the rare talent of detecting and communicating with demons and spirits. Rhys is known to be a spirit medium.[3]

There are limitations to the application of magic, however. Just as a man has the strength to lift only so much weight and no more, a mage cannot work more magic at one time than his mana allows. If he wishes to work magic that would be beyond his strength, a mage must bolster his mana with lyrium. Without lyrium, it is possible for the reckless to expend their own life-force in the working of magic, and occasionally, ambitious apprentices injure or even kill themselves by over-exertion.[2]

Teleportation, resurrection (under normal circumstances) [4] and physically entering the Fade (in the absence of a great deal of lyrium and potentially the aid of blood magic) are not possible.[5] Magic also cannot prevent a potentially fatal incident such as falling from a building.[6] Furthermore, the powers of a mage require a direct line of sight to a target, and have a limited range.[7]

There are two schools of magic that bear no connection to the Fade: blood magic, which draws power directly from blood, and blight magic, which is driven by the taint.

The working of magic

A mage uses magic by tapping into the power of the Fade to essentially question reality, rendering it mutable and able to be reshaped. To this end, templars are the ideal foils for mages, having been trained specifically to counter and "deny" magic.[8] This is done by a unique method of reinforcing the reality and immutability of the world. Like a door being slammed in the mage's face, magical effects dissipate and the mage is unable to reshape a suddenly stubborn world. From a mage's perspective it appears to be less spell interruption and more a templar reinforcing a reality in which that spell cannot be cast in the first place.[9] Cole offers a different explanation for the powers of the templars: after ingesting lyrium their bodies become incomplete and try to connect to something older and bigger than they are. They reach for that "other thing" and magic has no room to come in.[10]

Schools of Magic

History

No one knows who first discovered magic, but it has been a part of the world of Thedas for as long as people can remember. From the elves of Arlathan to the mages of Tevinter, both humans and elves have been known to wield magic.

Before it became the Imperium, Tevinter was ruled by a dynasty of kings. And long before the Chantry there was a Circle of Magi: the society of mages in each city. The titles the modern Circles use—enchanter, senior enchanter, first enchanter—all originated here. But above the first enchanter, the Circles of Tevinter had another office: magister.

The magisters formed a council of the most powerful mages in the kingdom. They convened in Minrathous and held dominion over all magic in the land. When Darinius seized the throne in -1195 Ancient, the Court of the Magisters became the royal court, and "magister" was the only title of nobility recognized in Tevinter.[11]

Prior to the Circle’s formation, magic was either practiced by the Magisters of the Tevinter Imperium or in remote areas, knowledge handed down from one generation of practitioners to the next. “Hedge mages,” as Enchanters of the Circle refer to them, or “witches” as legend would name them, do not always employ forbidden magic. Quite often their talents lie in the creation of charms, the use of curses and the ability to change their own forms.[12] Examples of such Hedge mages and witches include the so-called "witches" of the Chasind wilders or the "shamans" of the Avvar barbarians.[13]

In the quest Long Way Home (Dragon Age II), it is revealed that elves were heavily reliant on magic in the days of Arlathan, and that it is possible that it was they who taught blood magic to the Tevinter magisters. Merrill, for instance, once refers to her blood magic as "the old ways." Legend holds that the first known blood mage, at least for the humans, was a Tevinter: Archon Thalsian. Thalsian was supposedly taught how to use blood magic by the Old God Dumat. Over the years, some historians have argued that this is merely a myth, and that Thalsian learned about blood magic from the elves. Thalsian taught blood magic to others and soon amassed an army, which he used to conquer Elvhenan, the homeland of the elves. This was the start of the Tevinter Imperium, which grew to include most of Thedas, and which worshipped the Old Gods.

The Imperium was not satisfied with control of Thedas, however, and in an incredible act of hubris, the magister lords attempted to enter the Golden City and supposedly usurp the Maker Himself. Their efforts failed, and to punish them, Chantry historians believe that the Maker transformed them into the first darkspawn. These darkspawn fled underground, and eventually found Dumat and transformed him into the first Archdemon. Thus began the First Blight, which would continue for two centuries and greatly weakened the Tevinter Imperium.

In the wake of the First Blight, the people of the Imperium became disillusioned with the Old Gods, and soon began to follow Andraste, a former slave who united the barbarian tribes and led them to break the Imperium's hold on Thedas. Andraste was ultimately betrayed by her husband, Maferath, and burned at the stake, but her death inspired the creation of the Chantry, an event that would alter the face of magic for centuries afterwards.

The Chantry

In 1:20 Divine, the Chantry and the Inquisition signed the Nevarran Accord, and created the Circle of Magi, the Templar Order and the Seekers of Truth.[14]

As magic had been the source of the Imperium's power, it was all but banned when the Chantry became the new dominant force in Thedas. Blood magic was completely forbidden, and those who practised any kind of magic were confined. At first, the Chantry detained mages and had them continually light the eternal flame in every chantry in Thedas, with all other forms of magic forbidden. For such powerful beings to only use their powers in such mundane ways, it surprised almost no one when the mages of the Grand Cathedral protested. Divine Ambrosia was surprised and almost ordered an Exalted March on her own Cathedral, until her own templars advised her otherwise.[15] The Circle of Magi was established to regulate the use of magic throughout Thedas, and the Templar Order was founded to police the Circles and capture or eliminate apostate mages.

Modern Thedas

Andrastian nations

Mage Green Ronin

Mage from Dragon Age RPG

Mages attacking a Pride Demon
Main article: Circle of Magi

In the Dragon Age, most mages in Thedas belong to the Circle of Magi. As such, they are taken from their families while still children, and highborn children who are able to use magic will lose all claims to their family's estates and titles when they are taken to the Circle. This helps to create a bond stronger than social class or race, since everybody in the Circle is raised and taught the same way.

Children who are born to mages within the Circle are taken to be raised in a Chantry orphanage, either until they are old enough to make a life on their own (likely within the Chantry itself as a cleric or templar) or their magical abilities have manifested and they are returned to the Circle.[16]

Upon joining a Circle, mages undergo a process as apprentices of having a few drops of their blood taken by the First Enchanter[17] and placed in a phylactery. This ensures the mages' compliance as well as the ability to track down any mage who decides to run away, since a templar can track anyone through their blood. As a further measure, mages who are feared to be incapable of controlling themselves, or who fear their power, are made Tranquil: their connection to the Fade is magically severed along with their emotions and desires.

Though templars insist that the process is painless, the experience appears to be debatable and as unique as the individual who has been rendered Tranquil.[18] The Tranquil are easily identified by their eerie monotone voices, the Chantry sunburst brand on their foreheads, and their emotional apathy, even during life-threatening circumstances. It is worth noting, however, that under normal circumstances there is a reason a mage either is made Tranquil or requests it. Furthermore, imposing the Rite of Tranquility normally requires the agreement of both the Circle Knight-Commander and First Enchanter.[19]

The Harrowing is a test that every mage-apprentice must go through to become a full member of the Circle of Magi. Upon successful completion of his or her Harrowing, an apprentice is considered a full-fledged mage, capable of defending himself or herself from demonic possession.

Some mages manage to escape the notice of the Chantry and the Circle, and grow up without the training that those who are taken from their families will have. Any mage not a part of the Circle is considered to be an apostate, and will be hunted by templars if discovered. Often apostates will wield magic unknown or forbidden to the Circle, and considered threatening by the Chantry. Such mages include the Witches of the Wilds, who are capable of changing their shape and are frequently harassed by templars.[20]

Most humans are taught by the Chantry to fear magic and those who practice it. Mages are looked upon as people to be pitied at best, and hated at worst.[21] The average citizen sincerely believes that the Circle exists only to protect mages and help them learn to control their abilities.

Tevinter

Dragon-age-concept05

Tevinter Concept Art

Tevinter mages

Tevinter Mages

The native culture in the Tevinter Imperium is that magic is considered a mark of honor, especially for those who are powerful enough and adept to use it to their advantage. Tevinter has its own Imperial Chantry and many of its mages are the scions of its ancient noble bloodlines, who have long nurtured the magic in their genealogy. Even Tevinter commoners view magic as a gift and a part of their culture, so mages are respected across all social classes more than in other countries. In fact, the hope that their offspring or descendants will be born a mage and thus raise the family's social status keeps the commoners placated.

Due to the Imperium's rooted history with magic, the descendants of Tevinter's elite, even after converting to Andrastian teachings, still retained their power and influence but their appreciation of magic conflicted with the Chantry's fear of magic. This inevitable conflict in beliefs led to a schism in ideology between the Tevinter Chantry and the Orlais Chantry. The Tevinter Chantry argued that the Chant of Light's commandment, "magic exists to serve man, and never to rule over him," meant that magic must serve the greater good. They believed that this could be accomplished by freeing Magi to take part in government. After the Imperial Chantry broke away from the Orlesian Chantry's influence, mages were allowed to assume their place as the true rulers of the nation once again.

Though mages rule Tevinter, not all mages are equal. Where one falls in the social hierarchy is dependent on where one falls in Tevinter's caste system. If a mage isn't born in the right family, chances are they don't rule anything. Tevinter Circles of Magi are prestigious academies, not mage prisons. Yet admittance to a Tevinter Circle is a privilege, not a right.[22] The mages in Tevinter aspire to be magisters: the true rulers of the Imperium. Obtaining status and influence in the Tevinter Imperium is highly competitive however and thus often breeds practices of greed, corruption, and blood magic. Those without magic are trampled underfoot and forced to serve. Behind closed doors, slaves are sometimes sacrificed to fuel a magister's forbidden magic. Even some mages are not spared, for in mages as in all humans, there exists a spectrum—on one end, the very powerful, on the other, those that can barely light a candle. The Empire cares only for the strongest, and those who do not compare favorably are thrown to the wolves.[23]

Slaves and Liberati, particularly elves, who demonstrate magical ability are furthermore able to join the Circle of Magi and the lowest rungs of mage society. This applies as well to the children of elven slaves, and facilitates a dubious sense among them of a "meritocracy" within Tevinter even amongst the lowest classes. However, even for those gifted elven slaves who are able to join the magocracy, there is still an element of racism that creates obstacles beyond being seen as a fellow mage. Furthermore, mundane slaves cannot, of course, take part in this meritocratic system any more than any other non-talented citizen can.[24]

According to Fenris, though magisters claim that blood magic is forbidden, it's no secret that any Tevinter mage of rank secretly practices it or at least are proficient in its use. This is also confirmed by Lambert and Dorian. However, what is considered blood magic in Tevinter is different than what other Andrastian nations consider blood magic. Still, even what Tevinter considers forbidden magic is practiced by the upper echelon behind closed doors in order to maintain their edge against their adversaries.

Hedge Mages

Apostate mages

Apostate mages[25]

Main article: Hedge mage

Hedge mages are untrained magic-users who wield powers developed outside of conventional teaching[26] of the Circle of Magi and because of this, they are all apostates. Some of these hedge mages are not even aware of their nature. Undeveloped, their abilities can express themselves in a variety of ways, which the hedge mage might attribute to faith, or will, or to another being entirely (depending on the mage's nature).[13]

More specifically hedge magic, known by its more technical name "arcanist derangement"[27] among mages and scholars, is a form of magical expression different than that of typical mages. The term was coined by Magister Allineas at the height of the Towers Age. The magister posited that magical talent is like a flowing river. When expressed through a mage, it finds a proper outlet through spellcraft. Left to its own devices it flows unexpectedly, and thus hedge mages are created. Prior to the creation of the Circles, such magical talent expressed itself often through ancient traditions and rituals. Those mages possessed powers that no Circle spell could replicate and their unpredictable ability was deemed a threat.

Hedge mages live chaotic lives, able to commune with spirits, lured into darkness and temptation and sometimes even insanity. Their lives are often short as a result of this wild talent. The term "arcanist derangement" reflects this propensity toward madness in such mages.[28]

The term "hedge mage" was created as a derogatory term by the Chantry.[27]

Rivain

The Rivaini, unlike the majority of peoples in Thedas, are not andrastians and don't believe in the Maker. Rather, they are pantheists who believe in the Natural Order. As such, many hold to the belief that their god and the universe are the same.[29] Many, especially in Kont-aar, have also converted to the Qun, as their religion and the Qun are not very contradictory. According to Ferdinand Genitivi, a well-known Chantry scholar, "The Chant of Light never truly reached the ears of these people. Resistance to the Chant goes deeper than the Qunari Wars. The Rivaini refuse to be parted from their seers, wise women who are in fact hedge mages, communicating with spirits and actually allowing themselves to be possessed. The Chantry prohibition against such magical practices violates millennia of local tradition."[29]

Though a Circle existed in Rivain, it was merely a means to appease the Chantry. The mages of the Circle were allowed to see their families and the women were specifically trained to be seers, a position in Rivaini society that is revered as a matter of tradition. These local hedge witches converse with spirits and even allow themselves to be possessed, though it is supposedly done so for the benefit of their villages.[30]

Dalish elves

Dragon-Age-Adventurers

An elven mage and companions

Among non-humans, attitudes towards magic vary. The Dalish elves are, for all intents and purposes, the most accepting of their mages. Dalish believe that magic is a gift of the Creators[31] and study of magic is key to rediscovering their lost history. They do, however, acknowledge the inherent danger of magic, and take strides to reduce the risk, as well as avoid incurring the wrath of the templars. Dalish clans are known to exchange their mages if it seems like one clan has too many or too few, so no clan is left without any.[32] These children will be personally instructed by the new tribe's Keeper, and if they demonstrate sufficient aptitude will be elevated to be the Keeper's First (or Second), an apprentice expected to one day become the clan's new Keeper. In some clans, however, those that are extraneous beyond this may be cast out of the clan to survive, or die, on their own.[33]

Every Dalish clan is sworn to protect its Keeper to the death, and should the Keeper fall to demonic possession, the clan is bound to hunt and slay the Keeper. This happens rarely, however, as most Keepers are wise and careful enough to never make deals with demons or use blood magic.

Dalish magic tends to be more practical and subtle than human/Circle magic, shaped by the existence of the Dalish.[34] It is often turned to healing and tends to be more focused on natural forces.[35]

The ancient magic of "Veilfire" is also an elven art, though not specifically a Dalish one. Often used like a torch, veilfire is able to reveal hidden messages and gain impressions of past events, as well as illuminate dim passages...often with the accompanying unearthly whispers of the Fade. According to Solas, "it is a form of sympathetic magic, a memory of flame that burns where the Veil is thin."

Qunari

Qunari-01-mage bound-p

A saarebas concept

See also: Qunari#Magic

On the opposite end of Thedas, the Qunari, bound to order, have virtually no tolerance for mages, which they call saarebas (literally "dangerous thing"). Those among them who are found to possess magical ability are kept on leashes by special soldiers called arvaarad, and fitted with blinders. Their horns are sheared off and in extreme cases their lips may be stitched together. If a saarebas is found practicing forbidden magic, their tongues are cut out to prevent them from corrupting others.[36] Despite these measures, the Qunari pity and honor the saarebas as they believe that their striving while under constant threat from within is truly selfless and that is the highest virtue of the Qun.[22]

Surprisingly, the mages themselves accept their condition without question, as they manage to find some measure of solace within the Qun, since they believe there is a purpose to their existence, even if it means the loss of their freedom. If separated from their arvaarad, they are willing to accept death as they may be corrupted and not even be aware, presenting a danger to themselves and others, as was the case for Ketojan. They pity other mages who are not Qunari, because they will surely doom themselves and everyone who they come in contact with.

Notable mages in Dragon Age

For a complete list, see :Category:Magi.

Trivia

  • Referring to mages as "robes" is an insult.[37]
  • The term 'spellbind' is also considered a slur against mages.[38]
  • Hedge mages as a rule are not respected by enchanters in the Circle of Magi, but their untutored power can be incredible nevertheless.[39]
  • Inquisition's introduction of the Dalish limiting the number of mages within a clan contradict the previous presentation of multiple mages in Zathrian's clan in Dragon Age: Origins and multiple dialogues from Merrill in Dragon Age II on the issue, including her background that reads she was moved to the Sabrae clan because magic is dying out among the Dalish.

See also

Codex icon DAI Codex entry: Mage
Codex icon DAI Codex entry: Spellbinder

References

  1. Prima Official Game Guide (Collector's Edition), p. 252
  2. 2.0 2.1 Codex entry: Mana and the Use of Magic
  3. Dragon Age: Asunder, p. 285
  4. Wynne is an example of how bonding with a spirit at the moment of death may potentially circumvent this rule. Furthermore, according to Maevaris Tilani in Until We Sleep, it is rumored there may be healers who are capable of this.
  5. Codex entry: The Cardinal Rules of Magic.
  6. David Gaider. Dragon Age: Asunder, page 403.
  7. David Gaider. Dragon Age: The Stolen Throne, page 125.
  8. According to Ser (character).
  9. According to banter between Cassandra Pentaghast and Solas.
  10. First conversation with Cole after his recruitment.
  11. Codex entry: Tevinter: The Magisters
  12. Shapeshifter
  13. 13.0 13.1 Codex entry: Apostates
  14. Dragon Age: Asunder, Epilogue.
  15. Codex entry: History of the Circle
  16. David Gaider. Dragon Age: Asunder, page 120.
  17. According to Ser Thrask.
  18. Pharamond notes that Tranquility feels like an inescapable, smothering dream, while Owain states that he is content with his life and chose Tranquility.
  19. Your Random Dragon Age Question?.
  20. According to Morrigan when asked about growing up with Flemeth.
  21. Codex entry: Superstitions
  22. 22.0 22.1 Dragon Age logo - new Dragon Age: The World of Thedas, vol. 1, p. 103
  23. Codex entry: An Honest Answer Regarding Apostates
  24. David Gaider (July 14, 2014). Got the chance to interview David Gaider. Tumblr.
  25. Dragon Age (tabletop RPG), Player's Guide, set 2, p. 59
  26. Dragon Age: The World of Thedas, vol. 1, pg. 105.
  27. 27.0 27.1 Dragon Age: Asunder, pg. 285.
  28. Pharamond, Asunder
  29. 29.0 29.1 Dragon Age: The World of Thedas volume 1, page 80
  30. Dragon Age: The World of Thedas Volume 1, pg. 80
  31. Banter between Merrill and Bethany
  32. Codex entry: Merrill
  33. According to Minaeve.
  34. According to Solas.
  35. Dragon Age: The World of Thedas Volume 1
  36. Dragon Age II: The Complete Official Guide, p. 251
  37. Dragon Age: Asunder
  38. Dragon Age: The World of Thedas Volume 1, volume 1.
  39. According to item description for Storm Talons.
||Magi
Dwarf
For the class in specific games, see Warrior (Origins), Warrior (Dragon Age II), and Warrior (Inquisition).
Warrior

A warrior in battle

Warrior is one of the three playable starting classes in Dragon Age: Origins, Dragon Age: Origins - Awakening, Dragon Age Legends, Dragon Age II, Dragon Age (tabletop RPG), and Dragon Age: Inquisition. Warriors are the front-line fighters, the backbone of any party under assault.

In Dragon Age: Origins they rely on both melee and ranged weapons but in Dragon Age II and Dragon Age: Inquisition they only rely on melee weapons. Also they are supplemented by powerful special abilities that draw from deep reserves of stamina. They can withstand and deliver a great deal of punishment, and have a strong understanding of tactics. In Origins and Inquisition, all races can play as a warrior.

Warrior Green Ronin

Warrior from Dragon Age tabletop RPG by Green Ronin

Alistair Sword and Shield

Sword and Shield Warrior

Sten Two Hander

Two-Hander Warrior

Notable warriors

For a complete list, see :Category:Warriors.

Dragon Age: Origins

Dragon Age: Origins - Awakening

Dragon Age II

Dragon Age: Inquisition

See also

Codex icon DAI Codex entry: Bruiser
Codex icon DAI Codex entry: Guardsman
||Dwarven Commoner
Dwarf
For the class in specific games, see Warrior (Origins), Warrior (Dragon Age II), and Warrior (Inquisition).
Warrior

A warrior in battle

Warrior is one of the three playable starting classes in Dragon Age: Origins, Dragon Age: Origins - Awakening, Dragon Age Legends, Dragon Age II, Dragon Age (tabletop RPG), and Dragon Age: Inquisition. Warriors are the front-line fighters, the backbone of any party under assault.

In Dragon Age: Origins they rely on both melee and ranged weapons but in Dragon Age II and Dragon Age: Inquisition they only rely on melee weapons. Also they are supplemented by powerful special abilities that draw from deep reserves of stamina. They can withstand and deliver a great deal of punishment, and have a strong understanding of tactics. In Origins and Inquisition, all races can play as a warrior.

Warrior Green Ronin

Warrior from Dragon Age tabletop RPG by Green Ronin

Alistair Sword and Shield

Sword and Shield Warrior

Sten Two Hander

Two-Hander Warrior

Notable warriors

For a complete list, see :Category:Warriors.

Dragon Age: Origins

Dragon Age: Origins - Awakening

Dragon Age II

Dragon Age: Inquisition

See also

Codex icon DAI Codex entry: Bruiser
Codex icon DAI Codex entry: Guardsman
||Dwarven Noble
Dwarf
For the class in specific games, see Rogue (Origins), Rogue (Dragon Age II), and Rogue (Inquisition).
Rogue class

Rogue concept from Dragon Age RPG, set 1[1]

DA RPG Set 3 Rogue

Rogue concept from Dragon Age RPG, set 3[2]

Rogue is one of three playable classes in Dragon Age: Origins, Dragon Age: Origins - Awakening, Dragon Age Legends, Dragon Age II, Dragon Age (tabletop RPG), and Dragon Age: Inquisition. Rogues are crafty combatants who succeed in battle by combining speed, subterfuge, and a wide range of abilities to bring their opponents down in unexpected ways, sometimes before the enemy even perceives danger.

Rogues can pick locks with great skill[3], incapacitate enemies with ease, or sneak up on targets to deliver a devious and crippling backstab. Dexterity and Cunning are essential for a rogue, as many rogue and rogue specialization abilities rely on high cunning and dexterity.

Notable rogues

For a complete list, see :Category:Rogues.

Dragon Age: Origins

Dragon Age: Origins - Awakening

Dragon Age II

Dragon Age: Inquisition

See also

Codex icon DAI Codex entry: Archers
Codex icon DAI Codex entry: Prowler
Codex icon DAI Codex entry: Foot Soldier

Gallery

References

  1. Dragon Age RPG Set Player's Guide, page 28.
  2. http://greenronin.com/2013/04/dragon_age_set_3_class_preview_1.php
  3. Rogues are the only class capable of picking locks on both chests and doors in Dragon Age: Origins and Dragon Age II, and this trend continues in Dragon Age: Inquisition, per Mike Laidlaw.
||Dwarven Commoner
Dwarf
For the class in specific games, see Rogue (Origins), Rogue (Dragon Age II), and Rogue (Inquisition).
Rogue class

Rogue concept from Dragon Age RPG, set 1[1]

DA RPG Set 3 Rogue

Rogue concept from Dragon Age RPG, set 3[2]

Rogue is one of three playable classes in Dragon Age: Origins, Dragon Age: Origins - Awakening, Dragon Age Legends, Dragon Age II, Dragon Age (tabletop RPG), and Dragon Age: Inquisition. Rogues are crafty combatants who succeed in battle by combining speed, subterfuge, and a wide range of abilities to bring their opponents down in unexpected ways, sometimes before the enemy even perceives danger.

Rogues can pick locks with great skill[3], incapacitate enemies with ease, or sneak up on targets to deliver a devious and crippling backstab. Dexterity and Cunning are essential for a rogue, as many rogue and rogue specialization abilities rely on high cunning and dexterity.

Notable rogues

For a complete list, see :Category:Rogues.

Dragon Age: Origins

Dragon Age: Origins - Awakening

Dragon Age II

Dragon Age: Inquisition

See also

Codex icon DAI Codex entry: Archers
Codex icon DAI Codex entry: Prowler
Codex icon DAI Codex entry: Foot Soldier

Gallery

References

  1. Dragon Age RPG Set Player's Guide, page 28.
  2. http://greenronin.com/2013/04/dragon_age_set_3_class_preview_1.php
  3. Rogues are the only class capable of picking locks on both chests and doors in Dragon Age: Origins and Dragon Age II, and this trend continues in Dragon Age: Inquisition, per Mike Laidlaw.
||Dwarven Noble


Human Noble

Human Noble
"Brave of you sir, to so
openly cast an envious eye
towards me and mine.
I suggest you look elsewhere,
lest I consider removing your sight in a more
permanent fashion."

Surname

Cousland

Given Names (Default)

Male: Aedan
Female: Elissa

Summary

Main article: Human Noble Origin

Born to wealth and power second only to royalty, you find your training in both diplomacy and war put to the test when your father's castle is betrayed from within on the very night your elder brother leads the family's forces to war.

Description

"Some lands are ruled by men and women who believe that they have been elevated to their rank by the Maker Himself, but in Ferelden it is believed that a ruler must earn their place. The nobility is not suffered gladly, as the Orlesian Empire once discovered to its dismay when it attempted to occupy the land only to be overthrown by its people.

The Couslands have stewarded the lands of Highever for many generations, dating back to less civilized days before the crowning of Ferelden's first king. They could only have done so by earning the respect of its people through their reputation for justice and temperance, as well as their willingness to lead his men into battle. With the rise of the darkspawn horde in the south it thus falls on the Teyrn of Highever to send out the call once again: duty demands that an army be assembled and sent to King Cailan's aid at once.

As the Couslands will quickly discover, however, the darkness in Ferelden does not only lie in the heart of the evil horde in the south. Treachery stalks the halls of Highever Castle, as there are many men who would use even the occasion of a Blight to further their own ambitions.

As a young scion of the Cousland family, the duty of carrying its banner will fall to you. Will you live up to your family's proud heritage? Or will you forge your own path, and damn the consequences?"

Unique Origin Items

Plt ico family sword Family Sword
Ico shield kitemetal Shield of Highever

City Elf

City Elf
"Take another step,
human, and I guarantee it shall be your last.
My friends are dead and my life is in tatters
because of you and your kin. I have
nothing to lose, but you still possess
your other eye."

Surname

Tabris

Given Names (Default)

Male: Darrian
Female: Kallian

Summary

Main article: City Elf Origin

You have always lived under the heavy thumb of your human overlords, but when a local lord claiming his privilege with the bride shatters your wedding day, the simmering racial tensions explode in a rain of vengeance.

Description

"They planted a tree in the middle of the alienage long ago. Today it stands tall, healthy and green in sharp contrast to the city around it. For we are the poorest of the poor, the unwanted and the unwelcome huddled on the other side of the wall that separates us from the human part of the city. We are allowed to go there, to work on the docks or in their taverns and in their homes, but when dusk comes we must return. Any elf caught outside the alienage at night is likely to be mistaken for a sneak-thief or a pickpocket and let us be honest, the ones that stay out there at night probably are.

Our elder tells us that the tree is called the vhenadahl, and in the ancient elven tongue that means tree of the people. Its roots are deep and the elder says that as long as the vhenadahl lives so shall we. But he also says that there was once a time when our people lived in their own lands. He says that we were once ageless and strong, that it was the humans who took all this from us.

Is it true? Have we fallen so far? We are not unhappy. As poor as we are, we have a home. The alienage is no prison, it protects us, just as the vhenadahl shelters us. We dance and sing and make merry, stealing what moments we can to enjoy what little we have and I believe we appreciate it far more than the humans do. They have everything and appreciate nothing.

And perhaps the day will come when the humans come and try to take the alienage from us, too. If that day comes, I swear they shall regret it."

Unique Origin Items

Ico boots light Adaia's Boots
Ico longsword Borrowed Longsword
Ico dagger Fang (during Unrest in the Alienage)
Ico belt Fencer's Cinch
Ico clothing Wedding Clothes
Ico ring Wedding Ring (female City Elf only)

Dalish Elf

Dalish Elf
"What a wonder it is to see such
stalwart bravado in one such as
yourself. It is heartwarming,
truly, to see that there are yet
humans willing to risk a slow
and torturous death in pursuit of
our most sacred treasures."

Surname

Mahariel

Given Names (Default)

Male: Theron
Female: Lyna

Summary

Main article: Dalish Elf Origin

Proud of your role as one of the last 'true elves', you have always assumed you would spend your life wandering with your clan... until a chance encounter with a relic of your people's past threatens to tear you away from everything you've known.

Description

"'We are the Dalish: keepers of the lost lore, walkers of the lonely path. We are the last of the Elvhenan, and never again shall we submit.'

This is the oath the Dalish elves hold close to their hearts. In ancient times the elves ruled over Thedas alone, ageless and beautiful, until the humans came. Enslaved for a thousand years, the elves lost not only their immortality but their very identity. The Dalish are those elves who proudly refuse to live in human cities, proudly wandering the most remote corners of the wild lands in small clans that rarely meet. Their wagons are welcome nowhere, and more than one tale is told of the Dalish clashing with remote villagers who attempt to drive them away by force.

Much has been lost, but the Dalish will find what has been lost and keep it safe. They will re-learn the elven tongue, rediscover the ancient crafts and practice the old magics. They will spurn the human god and instead cleave to the ancient pantheon of the elves, praying that one day their own gods will return and lead their people to a new homeland. There the Dalish will await the return of those elves who have forgotten what they were, they will teach them to remember.

And until that day comes most importantly they will stand fast. As long as the landships are seen on the horizon there will be hope, hope that what was long ago shattered by the touch of mortal man may one day yet be restored."

Unique Origin Items

Ico belt Dalish Leather Belt
Ico ring Keeper's Ring

Magi

Mage
"Tread carefully, friend.
If you intend to cross the
path of one whose soul is
so tightly woven into the realm of the arcane,
I would not suggest
you do it lightly."

Surnames

Elven mage: Surana

Human mage: Amell

Given Names (Default)

Elven Male: Alim
Elven Female: Neria

Human Male: Daylen
Human Female: Solona

Summary

Main article: Mage Origin

Gifted with a power considered dangerous by most, you have spent most of your life secluded in the remote tower of the Circle of Magi to be trained and watched closely by the dreaded templars. Now your final test is upon you -- succeed and prove your strength or be slain.

Description

"The Circle of Magi exists to protect mages from a world that fears them, or so the young apprentices that are brought there are told. In truth, it exists as much to protect the world from the mages themselves. A time once existed when mages ruled the known world, bringing down ruin upon their enemies until at last they were overthrown. Now they are watched carefully by the Templars, mage-hunters aligned with the Chantry priests who would not hesitate to strike down any mage at the first sign of corruption.

For the temptations offered to mages are many. Their power draws demons to them from the Fade, demons that will attempt to wrest control of a mage's body and transform him/her into a vile abomination. What these demons cannot take by force they will sometimes attempt to take through deceit, offering knowledge of forbidden blood magic that allows a mage to control the minds of others and use their very life force to fuel his/her powers, leading him/her down a dark and destructive path.

All apprentices are taught to resist these temptations in the Circle of Magi, and the day comes when they must pass their final test: the Harrowing. They are literally thrown to the wolves, given over to a demon to either summon the willpower to defeat it or be possessed and die at templar hands. If the apprentice refuses they are made Tranquil, cut off from all emotion and magic and rendered unable to be possessed for their own good. There are no other options, save to flee and be branded an apostate and thus hunted by the templars forever.

Welcome to the Circle - the power to command the forces of magic is yours, for a price

Unique Origin Items

Ico staff Blackened Heartwood Staff
Ico boots light Fade Striders
Ico ring Ring of Study
Ico amulet Spirit Charm

Dwarf Commoner

Casteless Dwarf
" I suggest you reach for your purse
swiftly friend. Ale may have dulled
my senses enough so that I merely
maim your pretty features,
but should I become sober I will be
in a mood to show
you a new realm of pain and violence."

Surname

Brosca

Given Names (Default)

Male: Faren
Female: Natia

Summary

Main article: Dwarf Commoner Origin

Born casteless in a land where rank is everything, bound as the lackey and thug of a local crime lord, you have spent your life invisible... until chance thrusts you into the spotlight, where you can finally prove whether you will be defined by your actions or your birth.

Description

"There was a merchant come by Dust Town the other day, some poor sod who's had his skin burnt by the sun up on the surface lands once too often I'd say. How he gets let back into Orzammar I can't rightly say; he claims that he has a deal worked out. Who am I to argue when someone has an angle?

Point is, he tells me what them cloudheads think of us dwarves down here. It isn't even just the humans, there's surface dwarves who're born and bred up in the sun who think the same things, don't know any different. He says they say dwarves are smiths. Proud, noble warriors who like nothing better to mine a vein of ore or forge a decent sword.

Had us a good laugh, we did.

What would them humans think if they came to Dust Town and saw how the rest of us really lived? The ones that are casteless, the ones who aren't even considered worthy of being servants in the homes of the wealthy or pure enough to work the forges in the Shaperate. The nobles make sure we casteless get tattooed so they know who we are when they see us. That way they know who to spit on, right? Helps us, too. Makes it easier to figure out whose pockets are worth picking.

That's a joke. Not all of the casteless are criminals. Some of us are beggars, nug-catchers, street sweepers, and noble hunters. We do what we can to survive."

Unique Origin Item

Ico mace Aeducan Mace (from Duncan at end of origin)

Dwarf Noble

Dwarf Noble
"What I have seen and done to
achieve my position defies belief.
What I am capable of and will
be party to in order to retain it
would chill your soul."

Surname

Aeducan

Given Names (Default)

Male: Duran
Female: Sereda

Summary

Main article: Dwarf Noble Origin

The favored child of the dwarven king, you proudly take up your first military command... only to learn that the deadly intrigues of dwarven politics can pose a greater danger than even that faced on the battlefield.

Description

"It is said that when the dwarves die, their spirits return to the Stone. This is not a reference to some mythological entity but rather to the actual stone that surrounds them. It is the roof over their head, the ground under their feet, the very basis from which their statues and architecture all are drawn from. Is it any wonder that they would apply such a reverence towards it?

Those dwarves who are strong and who do their duty are said to make the Stone stronger when they return to it. They add to the foundation's strength. Those who are weak, who are unlucky or criminal weaken the foundation or are rejected by the Stone altogether. Thus the struggle to prove one's worth is central to dwarven culture. Their noble houses connive and plot to eclipse each other in the Assembly, often resorting to intrigues such as assassination and blackmail to increase their own prestige. So long as the appearance of honor is maintained, the end always justifies the means.

House Aeducan has been prominent ever since its founding Paragon rose up to lead the defense of Orzammar against the darkspawn horde during the First Blight. With Endrin Aeducan the currently elected King, the House has been ascendant and thus is watched carefully by the envious and ambitious alike. Endrin is old, however, and the time has come for one of his children to make their move: they will prove their worth in replacing their father or fall to treachery from within their own family.

The halls of Orzammar run deep, they say, but the blood runs deeper."

Unique Origin Items

Ico shield largeroundmetal Aeducan Family Shield (given to the Warden by Gorim in Denerim)
Ico longsword Fine Dwarven Blade*
Ico armor heavy Superior Dwarven Guard Armor (found on one of the corpses near the end of the origin.)

Note: The Fine Dwarven Blade can only be obtained by not killing your brother and selecting the "I'm innocent" option then choosing to reassure him of this (selecting the other option will not let you get this blade). Alternatively, killing Trian with at least one point in Coercion can allow you to lie to Harrowmont and still get similar results. Do not choose any other option or you will be sent in with a dagger and shield only. You will be given the option after to say two of the 5 (the other 2 which would lead to not obtaining the blade are gone) original options. The blade will be in your bag, not equipped so remember to do so.

Bugs

Prior to Patch 1.02, some players reported that the game would permanantly remove from the player's inventory all DLC, including the Blood Dragon Armor breastplate. To resolve the issue without installing Patch 1.02 (or if Patch 1.02 fails to return the DLC to the inventory), try the following sequence:

  1. save the game
  2. quit to the menu
  3. disable the DLC
  4. force load the save
  5. save again
  6. quit to the menu
  7. re-enable the DLC
  8. load again

Grey Warden

In Dragon Age: Origins - Awakening, a newly created character (i.e., one that was not imported from Origins) must choose the Grey Warden origin. The character will be an experienced Warden sent from Orlais to take charge of rebuilding the order in Ferelden.

Description

The Grey Wardens were once exiled from Ferelden for attempting to overthrow the king. They were permitted to return twenty years ago by King Maric, Cailan's father.

Given Names (Default)

Unlike Origins, the default name does not change depending on class, only on race and gender.

Male

  • Human: Gerod Caron
  • Elven: Elyon Andras
  • Dwarven: Eram Kader

Female

  • Human: Leonie Caron
  • Elven: Sidona Andras
  • Dwarven: Nika Kader

Unique Origin Equipment

Warrior

Ico armor massive Orlesian Warden's Plate Armor

Rogue

Ico helm light Grey Warden Light Helm
Ico gloves light Grey Warden Light Gloves
Ico armor light Orlesian Warden's Light Armor
Ico boots light Grey Warden Leather Boots
Ico longbow Commission

Mage

Ico helm cloth Grey Warden Cowl

Elementalist's Grasp may refer to:

Disambig gray This disambiguation page lists articles associated with the same title.
If an internal link led you here, you may wish to change the link to point directly to the intended article.
Ico armor robe Robes of the Orlesian Magister
Ico boots light Magus War Boots

Trivia

Template:DAOSpoiler

See also

External links

References

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